AMERICAN GAS – WHERE IS IT CHEAP?

The most succinct answer to the questioning title is: nowhere. The percentage increases seen across the United States are frightening consumers straight out of their large SUVs, very far away from new trucks and superfluous sporting cars, and closer to thoughtful driving and purchasing decisions.

News stories plastered all across the bottom eighth of your TV screen and headlining your iGoogle page prominently declare $4.00 per gallon gasoline. How will the Americans ever cope? Yet we all know that the $4.00 figure is an average. Unless everybody is paying the exact same price, some people must be paying more and some people must be paying less.

Stop by AmericanTrucks.com and check out
their large selection of F150 Intakes
Let GasBuddy.com answer the question posted in this title. Websites continue to sprout up in hopes of supplying savvy shoppers with the data they need to find the most inexpensive gas. GasBuddy.com continues to function as a user-supported site and gets closest to offering the numbers you need along with extra information that helps to clarify; information like the exact time the price was spotted.
Drive around the largest metropolitan areas in the USofA and you’ll see great variance in the price at the pump. Where is it cheap? The consensus-derived and lowest Numbers are below. The Good Car Guy will explain how great the difference is in practice…. er, driving, afterwards.
—–
$3.76 – Denver
$3.79 – Houston and Kansas City
$3.82 – San Antonio
$3.82 – Orlando
$3.84 – Dallas
———————————–
$4.19 – New York City
$4.29 – Los Angeles
$4.31 – San Francisco
$4.33 – San Diego
$4.35 – Sacramento
—–

The remainder of the nation’s thirty largest metro areas fall somewhere between these five lowest prices and the five highest. Considering America’s best-selling vehicle for the month of May, Honda’s excellent Civic (driven by The Good Car Guy here), what difference is seen by a driver over an equivalent commute in Denver and Sacramento? Here are more Numbers for your enjoyment.
59 – extra cents required to travel 29 miles in your Honda Civic (manual trans or automatic) in Sacramento, California than it would in Denver, Colorado, based on the EPA’s ‘combined’ rating for the regular 1.8L four-cylinder Civic
45 – total cost (measured in dollars, in the same car, with the same conditions) to drive a 300-mile weekly commute in Sacramento
38.90 – total cost (measured in dollars, in the same car, with the same conditions) to drive a 300-mile weekly commute in Denver
2,250 – total cost, in dollars, for 50 weeks of driving that 300-miles/week commute in Sacramento
1,945 – total cost, in dollars, for 50 weeks of driving that 300-miles/week commute in Denver; representing a $305 savings for a ‘typical’ Civic driver in Denver
4,350 – total cost, in dollars, for 50 weeks of drivint that 300-miles/week commute in Sacramento in a typical 15mpg Ford F150
3,760 – total cost, in dollars, for 50 weeks of driving that 300-miles/week commute in Denver in a typical 15mpg Ford F150; representing a $590 savings for a ‘typical’ F150 driver in Denver