2013 Jaguar XF red

It’s not hard to look at these lists of America’s worst-selling vehicles and find perfectly worthy and unsurprising examples. 

The Suzuki Equator doesn’t sell well because it’s a Suzuki, because Suzuki doesn’t try to sell Equators, and because you could just buy the real Equator, which is a Nissan Frontier. Again, the Mitsubishi i MiEV doesn’t sell well because it’s a Mitsubishi, because it is all-electric and thus has the range of a well-trained Labrador Retriever, and because it looks like a crazy concept from a counterculture Japanese auto show.

But then there are cars which are simply punished by numbers. The current Porsche Cayman, for example, is no longer current. Cars.com says Porsche only has 17 Caymans in stock in the United States. (Compare that to Porsche’s 559 units of Boxster inventory.) The Land Rover Range Rover is about to be replaced and, year-to-date, isn’t selling that badly for an aging, soon-to-be-replaced SUV. Mercedes-Benz’s $189,600-$198,400 SLS AMG actually sold significantly more often this October than last but, rather obviously, is not going to sell often at that price point.

2013 SLS AMG Mercedes-Benz

If Ferrari and Lamborghini rivals suffered from a proper sales release you’d see they don’t sell often, either. And unlike the identical Scion FR-S, the Subaru BRZ unfortunately isn’t sold in more heavily-trafficked Toyota showrooms and thus doesn’t sell as frequently. But does that mean Subaru USA has been disappointed with the BRZ’s 3120 sales in the last six months? Not at all.

As will always be the case in the future, historic brand and corporate totals (monthly and yearly going back to 2002) are now available through the dropdown menu at GCBC’s Sales Stats page, along with results for more than 260 currently sold vehicles. That’s where you’ll find out that Mercedes-Benz sold 13,717 SL-Class roadsters in 2002, when Americans bought millions more cars each year. Chevrolet Corvette volume won’t be much stronger than that this year, a year in which M-B might not sell 5000 SLs and SLS AMGs combined.

Below you’ll find America’s worst-selling vehicles ranked three different ways. Find it in yourself not to be too negative. And if you just can’t help it, check out the best sellers in order to get some positivity into your life.

Rank
Worst-Selling Car 
By Percentage Decline
% Change
October 2012
October 2011
#1
Porsche Cayman
– 96.7% 4 122
#2
Toyota Yaris
– 62.0% 2579 6792
#3
Mazda 6
– 55.9% 1515 3438
#4
Volvo S80
– 53.3% 163 349
#5
Land Rover Range Rover
– 49.3% 403 795
#6
Honda Insight
– 49.0% 251 492
#7
Infiniti EX
– 47.3% 247 492
#8
Acura TSX
– 47.0% 1577 2977
#9
Mercedes-Benz CL-Class
– 46.5% 54 101
#10
Jaguar XF
– 45.1% 278 506

Rank
Worst-Selling Car 
By Volume
October 2012
October 2011
% Change
#1
Suzuki Equator
135 203 – 33.5%
#2
Subaru Tribeca
184 266 – 30.8%
#3
Honda CR-Z
244 289 – 15.6%
#4
Honda Insight
251 492 – 49.0%
#5
Suzuki Kizashi
310 480 – 35.4%
#6
Volkswagen Eos
331 564 – 41.3%
#7
Nissan 370Z
383 442 – 13.3%
#8
Subaru BRZ
402 —– —–
#9
Mazda MX-5 Miata
461 354 + 20.2%
#10
Nissan Cube
475 198 + 140%

Rank
Worst-Selling Car 
By Volume (All Vehicles)
October 2012
October 2011
% Change
#1
Porsche Cayman
4 122 – 96.7%
#2
Acura RL
21 22 – 4.5%
#3
Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG
28 13 + 115%
#4
Mitsubishi i MiEV
30 —– —–
#5
Audi R8
47 69 – 31.9%
#6
Mercedes-Benz CL-Class
54 101 – 46.5%
#7
Nissan GT-R
86 101 – 14.9%
#8
Audi TT
129 194 – 33.5%
#9
Suzuki Equator
135 203 – 33.5%
#10
Mercedes-Benz G-Class
160 80 + 100%

Source: Manufacturers & ANDC 
Vehicle must have been on sale throughout October, must not have been officially cancelled by its manufacturer, and must have been showcased on manufacturer’s website in October. No longer deemed eligible: Chevrolet’s Caprice PPV, Lexus LFA, Honda FCX.

Related From GoodCarBadCar.net
Top 20 Worst-Selling Vehicles In America – October 2013
Top 10 Worst-Selling Vehicles In America – November 2012
Top 10 Worst-Selling Cars In America – September 2012
Top 10 Worst-Selling Cars In America – October 2011
Top 30 Best-Selling Vehicles In America – October 2012