Sporty Car Sales In Canada – August 2017


Sales of the Ford Mustang continue to show impressive year-on-year growth. August’s 170 more sales than the same month in 2016 makes for 24.6% growth.
The Chevrolet Camaro’s two fewer sales than in August last year shouldn’t be denigrated; it’s still the Camaro’s second best August in the Canadian market since 2011, and year-to-date sales are healthily up on this time last year.
Euro sports cars at the more premium end of the scale haven’t had it easy this year. Every single vehicle in our Euro Sports Car chart had a worse time in August 2017 than in the same month of 2016, and YTD sales of European marques in this category are down by almost a quarter on last year’s performance to the end of August.

You can click any model name in the tables below to find historical monthly and yearly Canadian auto sales data. You can also select a make and model at GCBC’s Sales Stats page. These tables are now sortable, so you can rank sports cars, coupes, GTs, roadsters, and convertibles any which way you like. Mobile users can now thumb across the tables for full-width access. Suggestions on how GCBC should break down segments can be passed on through the Contact page.


Click Column Headers To Sort • July 2017 • August 2016

American Muscle
Aug.
2017
Aug.
2016
%
Change
2017
YTD
2016
YTD
%
Change
232 234 -0.9% 2323 2014 15.3%
200 216 -7.4% 2728 2564 6.4%
862 692 24.6% 7139 6297 13.4%
Total
1294 1142 13.3% 12190 10875 12.1%
 
Euro Sports Cars
Aug.
2017
Aug.
2016
%
Change
2017
YTD
2016
YTD
%
Change
6 9 -33.3% 49 70 -30%
104 59 76.3% 382 481 -20.6%
0 8 59 79 -25.3%
47 56 -16.1% 294 424 -30.7%
18 29 -37.9% 175 220 -20.5%
35 69 -49.3% 272 287 -5.2%
42 36 16.7% 164 285 -42.5%
Total
252 266 -5.3% 1395 1846 -24.4%
 
Misc. Sporty Cars
Aug.
2017
Aug.
2016
%
Change
2017
YTD
2016
YTD
%
Change
415 129 221.7% 2317 1106 109.5%
147 152 -3.3% 1279 1496 -14.5%
213 158 34.8% 1746 1243 40.5%
36 34 5.9% 540 106 409.4%
0 4 10 27 -63%
91 8 1037.5% 828 30 2660%
56 64 -12.5% 344 362 -5%
89 74 20.3% 1032 808 27.7%
111 81 37% 740 750 -1.3%
64 53 20.8% 610 542 12.5%
412 477 -13.6% 3208 2867 11.9%
Toyota 86/Scion FRS
115 0 658 0
Total
1749 1234 41.7% 13312 9387 41.8%
 
Premium Sporty Cars
Aug.
2017
Aug.
2016
%
Change
2017
YTD
2016
YTD
%
Change
3 4 -25% 42 5 740%
11 23 -52.2% 198 111 78.4%
4 4 39 41 -4.9%
0 0 0 8
11 2 450% 43 46 -6.5%
Lexus LC
32 0 93 0
6 4 50% 32 56 -42.9%
2 30 -93.3% 133 131 1.5%
19 23 -17.4% 269 141 90.8%
9 29 -69% 104 109 -4.6%
174 97 79.4% 819 784 4.5%
0 0 0 1
Total
271 216 25.5% 1772 1433 23.7%
Source: Automakers & Global Automakers Of Canada
* also included in another GCBC segment breakdown
GCBC isn’t here to break down segments, an impossible task for any group, but to display sales data for the sake of comparison. The more ways sales data can be displayed, the better. This explains why you’ll see the Audi A5 here and with luxury cars, because readers have wanted it both ways. You can always find the sales results for EVERY vehicle and form your own competitive sets by using the All Vehicle Rankings posts. Clearly GoodCarBadCar is not suggesting that the cars in the tables above are all direct competitors. Establishing categories among cars as unique as even the Audi TT and Porsche Boxster has never pleased a single reader, so cars have been lumped together so you can simply see how buyers looking for sports cars, roadsters, hot hatches, convertibles, GTs, and wanna-be sports cars spend their money. Greater categorization of cars would only lead to problems that automakers create by not isolating model-specific sales figures: we don’t know how many M3s BMW has sold or how many Civics are Si models, for example. The numbers we do have are listed above. GoodCarBadCar is always open to hearing about the ways you would break down segments, so feel free to get in touch. 
 
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