Sporty Car Sales In Canada – July 2017


After a bumper June, the Dodge Challenger’s figures were less impressive in July. Though the Challenger’s YTD figures are up on the same point last year, its growth year-on-year is still behind the overall growth of the American Muscle market in Canada, which is almost 12% ahead of where it was at the start of August last year.

The same cannot be said for the Euro Sports Car market in Canada; sales are down across the board in this segment, with only the Audi TT coming out ahead of July 2016’s figures for the month – though Audi have a lot of work to do to catch up with 2016’s YTD figures.


You can click any model name in the tables below to find historical monthly and yearly Canadian auto sales data. You can also select a make and model at GCBC’s Sales Stats page. These tables are now sortable, so you can rank sports cars, coupes, GTs, roadsters, and convertibles any which way you like. Mobile users can now thumb across the tables for full-width access. Suggestions on how GCBC should break down segments can be passed on through the Contact page. 



Click Column Headers To Sort • June 2017July 2016

American Muscle
July.
2017
July.
2016
%
Change
2017
YTD
2016
YTD
%
Change
326 307 6.2% 2091 1780 17.5%
259 305 -15.1% 2528 2348 7.7%
978 773 26.5% 6277 5605 12%
Total
1563 1385 12.9% 10896 9733 11.9%
 
Euro Sports Cars
July.
2017
July.
2016
%
Change
2017
YTD
2016
YTD
%
Change
7 12 -41.7% 43 61 -29.5%
85 51 66.7% 278 422 -34.1%
0 11 0% 59 71 -16.9%
25 50 -50% 247 268 -32.9%
26 23 13% 157 191 -17.8%
52 72 -27.8% 237 218 8.7%
20 57 -64.9% 122 249 -51%
Total
215 276 -22.1% 1143 1580 -27.7%
 
Misc. Sporty Cars
July.
2017
July.
2016
%
Change
2017
YTD
2016
YTD
%
Change
442 137 222.6% 1902 977 94.7%
141 151 -6.6% 1132 1344 -15.8%
261 148 76.4% 1533 1085 41.3%
69 72 -4.2% 504 72 600%
0 3 0% 10 23 -56.5%
99 0 0% 737 22 3250%
49 52 -5.8% 288 298 -3.4%
103 105 -1.9% 943 734 28.5%
111 112 -0.9% 629 669 -6%
85 69 23.2% 546 489 11.7%
493 404 22% 2796 2390 17%
0 0 0% 0 50 0%
Total
1959 1253 56.3% 11563 8153 41.8%
 
Premium Sporty Cars
July.
2017
July.
2016
%
Change
2017
YTD
2016
YTD
%
Change
7 1 600% 39 1 3800%
11 29 -62.1% 187 88 112.5%
5 5 35 37 -5.4%
0 0 0% 0 8 0%
2 3 -33.3% 32 44 -27.3%
Lexus LC
29 0 0% 61 0 0%
5 6 -16.7% 26 52 -50%
8 8 0% 131 101 29.7%
20 35 -42.9% 250 118 111.9%
18 27 -33.3% 95 80 18.8%
136 164 -17.1% 645 687 -6.1%
0 0 0% 0 1 0%
Total
241 278 -13.3% 1501 1217 23.6%
Source: Automakers & Global Automakers Of Canada
* also included in another GCBC segment breakdown
GCBC isn’t here to break down segments, an impossible task for any group, but to display sales data for the sake of comparison. The more ways sales data can be displayed, the better. This explains why you’ll see the Audi A5 here and with luxury cars, because readers have wanted it both ways. You can always find the sales results for EVERY vehicle and form your own competitive sets by using the All Vehicle Rankings posts. Clearly GoodCarBadCar is not suggesting that the cars in the tables above are all direct competitors. Establishing categories among cars as unique as even the Audi TT and Porsche Boxster has never pleased a single reader, so cars have been lumped together so you can simply see how buyers looking for sports cars, roadsters, hot hatches, convertibles, GTs, and wanna-be sports cars spend their money. Greater categorization of cars would only lead to problems that automakers create by not isolating model-specific sales figures: we don’t know how many M3s BMW has sold or how many Civics are Si models, for example. The numbers we do have are listed above. GoodCarBadCar is always open to hearing about the ways you would break down segments, so feel free to get in touch. 
 
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