Top 30 Best-Selling Luxury Vehicles In America - 2011 Year End

2012 Bentley Continental GTC V8
Truly Premium: the Bentley Continental GTC V8
Porsche USA sold 12,978 Cayennes in 2011. That SUV sales total was up 56% from 2010. Volvo sold 12,932 XC60s, up 7.5% from 2010. Mercedes-Benz S-class sales were down 10% to 12,258 in the United States in 2011. Not a single one of these vehicles can be found on 2011's list of America's 30 best-selling premium vehicles. Some might argue that their absence relates to the fact that GoodCarBadCar includes the Hyundai Genesis (sales of which, by Hyundai's decision, include the Genesis Coupe) and the Chevrolet Corvette, two truly premium cars from two very mainstream brands.

Regardless, the Cayenne, XC60, and S-Class have all garnered a mention in this text, making you a thoroughly informed reader. It's not as if the Top 30 list needed any more Mercedes products: 17% of the table is filled by Benzes. Volvo managed to break in with the increasingly popular and truly handsome S60. And Porsche's 186-unit miss sends a message to Porsche from all the diehards who still don't want the Cayenne to exist. 

Leading the pack in 2011, as it did the previous year, is the BMW 3-Series. The new 3-Series sedan should mean the 2012 list will not not show any red font in the BMW's % Change column. The BMW 3-Series sedan recently won a place in GoodCarBadCar's The Good 12

America's favourite luxury utility was the Lexus RX, not surprisingly. Its closest rival was the Cadillac SRX, 26,994 sales back. The SRX was America's favourite American luxury vehicle, 559 sales ahead of its CTS sibling. The SRX was also twice as popular as the most popular Lincoln, the MKZ. The seventh-ranked CTS will have some in-showroom competition from the CTS-lite ATS in 2012. Its recent debut was hotly anticipated.

Last year's edition of this best-selling luxury post can be viewed here. Start checking out 2011's monthly versions with January's post here.

Rank
Best-Selling Luxury Vehicle
2011
2010
% Change
#1
BMW 3-Series
94,371 100,910 - 6.5%
#2
Lexus RX
82,595 95,790 - 13.8%
#3
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
69,314 58,785 + 17.9%
#4
Mercedes-Benz E-Class
62,736 60,922 + 3.0%
#5
Infiniti G
58,246 58,143 + 0.2%
#6
Cadillac SRX
55,601 51,975 + 7.0%
#7
Cadillac CTS
55,042 45,656 + 20.6%
#8
BMW 5-Series
51,491 39,488 + 30.4%
#9
Acura MDX
43,271 47,210 - 8.3%
#10
Lexus ES
40,873 48,652 - 16.0%
#11
BMW X5
40,547 35,776 + 13.3%
#12
Mercedes-Benz M-Class
38,835 29,698 + 20.7%
#13
Audi A4
35,234 34,672 + 1.6%
#14
Hyundai Genesis
32,998 29,122 + 13.3%
#15
Acura TL
31,237 34,049 - 8.3%
#16
Acura TSX
30,935 32,076 - 3.6%
#17
Lexus IS
29,669 34,129 - 13.1%
#18
BMW X3
27,793 6075 + 358%
#19
Lincoln MKZ
27,529 22,535 + 22.2%
#20
Cadillac Escalade
25,503 26,874 - 5.1%
#21
Mercedes-Benz GL-Class
25,139 19,943 + 26.1%
#22
Audi Q5
24,908 23,518 + 5.9%
#23
Mercedes-Benz GLK-Class
24,310 20,946 + 16.1%
#24
Lincoln MKX
23,395 21,932 + 6.7%
#25
Volvo S60
21,282 1437 + 1381%
#25
Audi A5
15,385 16,379 - 6.1%
#26
Land Rover Range Rover Sport
15,333 12,347 + 24.2%
#27
Acura RDX
15,196 14,975 + 1.5%
#28
Lexus CT200h
14,381 ----- -----
#29
Infiniti QX56
13,248 11,918 + 12.7%
#30
Chevrolet Corvette
13,164 12,624 + 4.3%
Source: Manufacturers & ANDC 
Red font indicates year-over-year declining sales 

Related From GoodCarBadCar.net
Top 30 Best-Selling Luxury Vehicles In America - 2012 Year End
Top 30 Best-Selling Luxury Vehicles In America - January 2012
Top 30 Best-Selling Luxury Vehicles In America - December 2011
Top 30 Best-Selling Vehicles In America - 2011 Year End
Luxury Auto Brand Market Share In America - 2011 Year End
Top 30 Best-Selling Luxury Vehicles In America - 2010 Year End

No comments:

Post a Comment

Please stay on topic. Feel free to argue and debate, but stay friendly and do not get personal. Comments signed as Anonymous will likely be rejected as possible spam. Login with a Google account or assign yourself a name. Keep in mind, kids read this site.

If the post on which you are commenting is more than 40 days old, the comment will undergo moderation as a means of avoiding spam.